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Curiosities

» Posted on 12 Jul 2012

Hello again in the summer fever. However, the fever, unfortunately, results in the frantic search for summer weather. You could have experienced it for example, on the 18th of July, Sunday, on the way to Krynica Morska. During the congress in Krynica, there was a string of vehicles already in Nowy Dwór Gdański travelling at a dizzying pace of 10 km/h to their desired destination by the sea. This line of cars on the main road in the direction of Elbląg was about a few kilometres long. In the evening, the same situation existed in the other direction – from Krynica towards Elbląg. Half of the day in the car….. ugh.

The fortunate owners of sailing equipment (engine and wind powered) can at the moment appreciate owning their own (or chartered) means of transport. On the water it can also be crowded but not to this degree.

In order not to awaken the readers from the mood of holiday intoxication, today I will present some interesting facts, more or less useful to most fans of sailing.

It shows the aluminium cleat to the trim line on the leech of the foresail of a 50-foot boat.

You can guess that it wasn’t sailing on Lake Kisajn or Niegocin.

The cleat by definition is strong, but …

Yeah, but … salt ate through it. Anodising the cleats was either done so fast, that the cleat was not aware of it, or was not done at all. The effect is visible.

How much of the cleats crumbled during its dismantling can be seen on the floor by the sail.

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The calibrator for entering the mainsail bolt rope into the sail track in the mast can be seen here.

Practically speaking, it can also be seen that the existing sail track profile would prevent damage to the belt on the luff of the mainsail when putting up.

The installed calibrator, however, has rounded contact surfaces with the front edge of the mainsail, about 3 times larger than the sail track itself, so inevitably the mainsail is much safer with this system. The boat on the picture is the “Sekstant” and belongs to the Navy Yacht Club “Kotwica” in Gdynia.

I’ve seen a lot of such patents and many more similar, which proves the great care of the ENTRUSTED equipment. It is a hackneyed phrase in military terminology, not always going hand in hand with reality, but here it is most appropriate.

If someone wants to check the facts, I recommend an old boat from 1978 called “Hadar”. I will come back to this vessel, because it’s worth it (in a month or two).

 

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Here, we have a method of attaching the mainsail clew to the boom. In smaller boats, this is solved either by using the same bolt rope on the foot of the mainsail or a slide attached to the hardware on the mainsail clew. For example, like this.

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The above example comes from a mainsail with an area of about 45 sq.m.

With such an area, there should be a mandatory hardware of appreciable size on the sheet, fixing the clew to the sail track. What you see in the picture was installed upon the express request of the customer. I do not know the fate of this solution, but I do not think that it worked for too long. Either the attached slide crumbled, or the tape broke, or the boom’s sail track’s wall bent.

For comparison – if it is difficult to find or make the correct connector of the mainsail sheet with the boom, I recommend the method used in the photo (no. 207) below.

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In photo no. 58, the solution is exemplary. It may not be the most sophisticated hardware, but it has been working flawlessly since 1978. That’s it. This patent is used on the “Hadar” (Navy Yacht Club “Kotwica” Boat)

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Simple and very expensive protection of the staysail halyard against jamming in the lashing block on the top of the mast. If the lashing block is quite large in size, at the moment of inattention we can jam a quite nasty knot on the staysail halyard at the top of the mast. A personal visit to this part of the boat is not one of the favourite activities of most of the crew members. More so on the high seas at 4-5 B. But – as I mentioned earlier, this is an expensive solution, unavailable for a wide range of sailboat users. I would recommend shipping stores.

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In the above pictures you can see the practical application of the so-called compensation foam.

It is sewed in to reduce the depth of the staysail during reefing on a rigid stay.

This makes sense especially for large boats, where reefing the genoa is the most practical solution (but not ideal for the sail).

Frequent change of the sail on the stay in recreational sailing is rather avoided primarily because of the safety of the crew. Very often, these crews consist of individuals not very trained in sailing and it is certainly safer to reef the genoa on the stay than to remove and replace it with a smaller staysail.

However, we should not overestimate the importance of compensation foam.

In the rolled-up position, it will gain some depth from the genoa, but still it is not a foresail profile for heavy weather.

And that would be it, as a certain scholar used to say on the television.